07
May
0 No comments

Winter is a dastardly time of year. Temperatures drop, the roads become slippery, and white water crystals flutter down from the sky. If you listed all of the characteristics about winter and included every danger you could think of, would mold be on that list? Well, it should be.

If you covered the surface area of one acre of land with a single inch of snow, that plot of land would hold 2,715 gallons of water. What happens when all of that snow melts?

One thing that could happen is serious flooding. You probably have already experienced a muddy backyard or basement water leaks during a spring melt, but have you experienced snow mold?

If you have ever seen a thin pink or grey webbing substance covering your plants or grass, your yard has succumbed to snow mold. It can damage your plants, lawn, and even the foundation of your home. Keep your garden at least six inches away from your foundation at all times. Letting your garden get overgrown in the spring might be pretty, but if mold gets too close to your home, it could easily cause rot. As long as you take care of the mold as soon as you notice it developing, you shouldn’t need to worry.

What people do recognize as dangerous, though, is flooding. There are many causes of flooding, but the most impactful problem during the spring thaw is grade. More specifically, the grade of the hill leading up to your home. Your home should be surrounded by earth that slopes downward in every direction for at least ten feet. If it doesn’t, melting snow will accumulate too close to the base of your foundation causing basement water leaks.

Snow is fun and enticing, but when it comes to home foundation health, it’s one of the worst sources of water damage. It can attack on two fronts: mold and melting. Be sure to keep an eye out for any signs of snow mold this spring.

Comments are closed.